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huffpostbooks:

The Inspiring Story behind Anna Karenina:
Anna Karenina (1877), Leo Tolstoy In January 1872, the death of a 35-year-old woman was reported in the Russian press: smartly dressed and carrying a bag containing a change of clothes, the girl had thrown herself under a freight train at Yasenki Station outside Moscow. The woman was identified as Anna Pirogova, a distant relative of Leo Tolstoy’s wife and the mistress of his good friend and neighbour, Alexander Bibikov. It soon transpired that Alexander had told Anna that he planned to leave her and marry his son’s new governess, and, unable to cope, she had left him a brief note — “You are my murderer; be happy, if an assassin can be happy” — and fled. Tolstoy himself attended Anna’s post-mortem the following day, and by all accounts the sight of the unrecognisable body of a woman he had known so well stayed with him long afterwards, so that when he came to begin a new novel more than a year later he already had its tragic conclusion in mind.
Read More Inspiring Stories Behind 15 Classic Novels

huffpostbooks:

The Inspiring Story behind Anna Karenina:

Anna Karenina (1877), Leo Tolstoy In January 1872, the death of a 35-year-old woman was reported in the Russian press: smartly dressed and carrying a bag containing a change of clothes, the girl had thrown herself under a freight train at Yasenki Station outside Moscow. The woman was identified as Anna Pirogova, a distant relative of Leo Tolstoy’s wife and the mistress of his good friend and neighbour, Alexander Bibikov. It soon transpired that Alexander had told Anna that he planned to leave her and marry his son’s new governess, and, unable to cope, she had left him a brief note — “You are my murderer; be happy, if an assassin can be happy” — and fled. Tolstoy himself attended Anna’s post-mortem the following day, and by all accounts the sight of the unrecognisable body of a woman he had known so well stayed with him long afterwards, so that when he came to begin a new novel more than a year later he already had its tragic conclusion in mind.

Read More Inspiring Stories Behind 15 Classic Novels

(via huffingtonpost)

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I am convinced that the truest act of courage, the strongest act of manliness, is to sacrifice ourselves for others in a totally non-violent struggle for justice. To be a man is to suffer for others. God help us be men.
Cesar Chavez, quoted in our upcoming show with Richard Rodriguez (via beingblog)

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tj:

This is a picture of three people from the Ferguson city commission.
Remember the story of how Ferguson police beat a man and then charged him with bleeding on their uniforms?
See that woman in the picture?
She was one of the cops who beat him.
Seriously what the fuck.
If you weren’t following #Ferguson on Twitter last night, you missed out. The city commission had a meeting where they tried to tell the people they couldn’t talk, but were eventually shouted down. So the All-White-Except-One city council sat there, gave people three minutes to speak, and said nothing, responded to nothing, and did nothing.
A couple of highlights:

A man arrested for peacefully protesting spoke up and said “I’ve done more jail time than Darren Wilson.”


“If Darren Wilson doesn’t get justice, you might as well bring back the army, because it’s going to be chaos,” said another.


ESPN E60 reportedly had a story about a football player from Ferguson who reported a harassment incident with Darren Wilson a week before Mike Brown. (Looked for more reports of this today and don’t see any. Sent a few messages to journalists who were covering Ferguson.)


Several people talked about how the “justice” system (more like “jüstice” system) in Ferguson routinely harasses and exploits people.


The whole thing seemed very organized, with people telling the council (paraphrased): “You’ve done nothing for us, and that’s why you’ve got a murder on your hands. Now we’re coming for you [meaning the various seats on the council]” with one woman in particular saying to the woman pictured above, “We’re coming for your seat first.”


This:



“I have 3 minutes to tell you I am ashamed of every single one of you.”

Source
Source

tj:

This is a picture of three people from the Ferguson city commission.

Remember the story of how Ferguson police beat a man and then charged him with bleeding on their uniforms?

See that woman in the picture?

She was one of the cops who beat him.

Seriously what the fuck.

If you weren’t following #Ferguson on Twitter last night, you missed out. The city commission had a meeting where they tried to tell the people they couldn’t talk, but were eventually shouted down. So the All-White-Except-One city council sat there, gave people three minutes to speak, and said nothing, responded to nothing, and did nothing.

A couple of highlights:

  1. A man arrested for peacefully protesting spoke up and said “I’ve done more jail time than Darren Wilson.”

  2. “If Darren Wilson doesn’t get justice, you might as well bring back the army, because it’s going to be chaos,” said another.

  3. ESPN E60 reportedly had a story about a football player from Ferguson who reported a harassment incident with Darren Wilson a week before Mike Brown. (Looked for more reports of this today and don’t see any. Sent a few messages to journalists who were covering Ferguson.)

  4. Several people talked about how the “justice” system (more like “jüstice” system) in Ferguson routinely harasses and exploits people.

  5. The whole thing seemed very organized, with people telling the council (paraphrased): “You’ve done nothing for us, and that’s why you’ve got a murder on your hands. Now we’re coming for you [meaning the various seats on the council]” with one woman in particular saying to the woman pictured above, “We’re coming for your seat first.”

  6. This:

“I have 3 minutes to tell you I am ashamed of every single one of you.”

Source

Source

(via foxxxynegrodamus)